TENNIKOIT FEDERATION OF INDIA

Welcome to Tennikoit Federation of India

Approved By: Govt of India, Recognised By: Ministry Of Youth Affairs & Sports, Govt. of India,

Affiliated To: World Tenniquoit Federation, Asian Tennikoit Confederation & School Game Federation of India

 

 

CLICK HERE for Rules

Tenniquoits

 

The basic goal of Tenniquoits is to throw a ring of solid rubber with one hand over a net into the opposing half of the court in such a wise, that the ring hits the ground or the opponent is unable to catch, control or return the ring.

 

While the continuous alternation of throw and catch of the ring during a match, the players of Tenniquoits combine a variety of different techniques to shoot and types of defensive and offensive shots with a skillful manner to catch a receiving ring with one hand.

 

A typical offensive shot for example, is a long shot with spin, thrown as a kind of lop into the back part of the opposing half of the court or a short shot with spin, thrown narrow across the net into a corner of the front part of the opponent’s half of the court. A typical defensive shot for example, is a high throw without spin, thrown into the back part of the opponent’s half of the court in order to keep the opponent away from the net.

 

To present an attractive, fast and sportsmanlike match, all actions of the players have to be executed in fluidly motions without unacceptable delays during the process from the receiving to the delivery of the ring.

 

In order to dominate the match, it is essential to gain an advantageous position close to the net, from where the player is capable to attack with an effective shot. The move to the net is realised by catching a high and long played ring with a stretched arm above the head or behind the body while the player jumps forward. A match between offensive players is characterised by a fight of position and ring with the permanent alternating attempt to press the opponent and open space at the corners of the opposing court half, where to make the point.

 

For tactical reasons it could be also successful for a player to restrict the main efforts to catch the ring and return it with a defensive throw into the back part of the opponent’s court half. With this, a defensive player is able to force the opponent to make mistakes or to make points by counterattacks.

 

The International Tenniquoits Rules are obliging for all international events under the leadership of the World Tenniquoits Federation. Moreover this rule-set could be a helpful guideline for other countries, which are currently not organised concerning this sport, to introduce Tenniquoits into their landscape of sports and to become a competitive member of the World Tenniquoits Federation. [Read complete Rules under Regulations]

 

 

with other name "Deck tennis"

 

 

Deck tennis is a sport that was played on the decks of passenger and cruise ships and is still practiced to a small extent. The sport is a hybrid between tennis and quoits, and is played with either the rubber disk or ring, or a similarly-sized rope ring. The sport has been standardized and formalized in several countries under names such as "tennikoit" or "ring tennis".

 

American sources from the 1930s and 1940s attribute the origin, or at least formal establishment of the game, to Cleve F. Shaffer.[1]

 

Rules

Most games of deck tennis, unlike the official tennikoit form, are informal and without set rules or a governing body, so rules tend to vary. Usually it is played on a court roughly 40 to 50 feet (11 to 14 m) long and 15 to 20 feet (5 to 7 m) wide and may be played as either as singles or doubles. The midcourt net is usually the height, or higher than that of a tennis net. The goal of the game is to serve (throw) the ring into the opponent's court, and the opponent tries to catch it before it falls and immediately throw it back from the same position where it was caught, with a point being scored when the server managed to land a quoit on the opponent's side of the court.

 

The scoring system is commonly the same as regular tennis: Love, 15, 30, 40, Deuce, Advantage, Game. This is in contrast with tennikoit, where sets are played to 21 individual points, similar to badminton.

 

Popularity

Deck Tennis is the official sport of the City of Warwick, Rhode Island. During its heyday in the 1980s and early 1990s, the City of Warwick held a citywide Deck Tennis competition.. The best Deck tennis player Is J.Ester(his first name is unknown).